Pegasus Group secures consent for 195 homes on appeal

Outline planning permission has been secured on appeal to build 195 homes in the Leicestershire village of Sileby, with Charnwood Borough Council ordered to pay partial costs.

National consultancy Pegasus Group successfully secured the consent on behalf of Hallam Land Management for development at Seagrave Road, Sileby in what has been a long running case – the original planning application was submitted in 2015 and an original appeal decision challenged and quashed.

The inquiry sat in two sessions, in February and June, and was headed up by planning inspector Michael J. Hetherington who said that the main issues of the appeal were:

  1. whether the appeal proposal would accord with the spatial strategy set out in the development plan;
  2. the effect of the proposal on the highway network and highway safety; and
  3. whether adequate living conditions would be achieved for the intended occupiers of the proposed development with regard to odour and noise from the nearby chicken farm.

In his report on the first two points, the inspector concluded that policies in the Charnwood Local Plan were out of date and that the proposed development would not have an adverse effect on traffic.

And on odour and noise from the nearby Sunrise Poultry Farm, he said:

“I have concluded that, subject to conditions, adequate living conditions would be achieved for the intended occupiers of the development with regard to odour and noise.”

Guy Longley, from Pegasus Group’s East Midlands office, said:

“At the reconvened appeal, the council added further putative reasons for refusal relating to noise and odour impacts from the chicken farm but the inspector accepted our consultant’s evidence that in this case the odour issue did not preclude development on the site.”

Debate at the Inquiry centred on the council being unable to demonstrate a five-year supply of land for housing.

The inspector reported:

“The provision of affordable housing, to be secured by the submitted Section 106 agreement, would in my view amount to a significant benefit.  Given that the Council is unable to demonstrate a five-year supply of land for housing… the provision of additional general market housing would also amount to a significant benefit.  Benefits would accrue to the local economy through construction and increased local spending.”

Pegasus Group Managing Director Tony Bateman provided expert evidence on housing and economic development needs assessments while James Atkin acted as expert witness on landscape and visual matters.